RI Nurse Residency

  • Why Passport to Practice?
  • Application Materials
  • Disclaimer
  • Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

  • Why Passport to Practice?

    Are you:

    Leeann and Preceptor

    One of our 2014-15 Nurse Residents with her Preceptor.

  • A recent Nursing graduate with an RN license, or about to graduate in May or June with your RN license?
  • Unemployed or underemployed?
  • Looking to gain more clinical experience, increase your network, advance your Nursing skills, and improve your access to available RN jobs?
  • Join Rhode Island’s premiere statewide Nurse Residency program!

    As a part of Passport to Practice, you will be a part of an innovative program that is setting nationwide precedent for developing the next generation of Nurse Leaders.

    We offer:

  • Incredible networking opportunities around Rhode Island with access to Nursing jobs
  • Innovative, advanced weekly “Nurse of the Future” didactic seminars, taught by leaders in Nursing and other allied health professionals in Rhode Island
  • Opportunities to develop and advance your professional skills, improve your interviewing talents, and refine your leadership style
  • One-on-one time with a Nurse Preceptor in acute, long-term care, community health settings (and more!)
  • Access to clinical experiences you did not have in college
  • Assistance with transitioning to a BSN program (if you do not already have your BSN)
  • All at no cost to you!

    Passport to Practice requires your commitment to advancing your skills, becoming a Nursing expert, and developing your leadership potential. In return, we are committed to pushing you to become the best Nurse you can be.

    We are a highly successful program. As of the halfway point in the current Cohort, 2/3 of our Nurse Residents have been hired as RNs!!

    Application materials:

    To apply for the RI Nurse Residency 2014-15 cohort, download the materials checklist and application here.


    Nurse nursing nurses jobs healthcare jobs recent grad Rhode Island RN ADN BSN RIC CCRI URI Salve St. Joseph Neonatal care


    Disclaimer:

    Acceptance into the Passport to Practice program is a competitive process. Number of Residents accepted into the second cohort is subject to funding.



    Frequently asked questions:

  • I want to apply for the program. How do I get an application?
  • Is this a Nurse Refresher program?
  • I called/emailed to express interest in the program and someone took down my information. Do I still need to apply?
  • When are applications due?
  • Do I need to live in Rhode Island to be a part of the program?
  • Where can I get a federal background check for the program?
  • Do I need to have a car to participate?
  • I am interested in becoming a nurse but just began a nursing program. Am I eligible to participate?
  • Is there a minimum GPA requirement?
  • I’m currently working as an RN but am interested in the program. Am I eligible?
  • I am currently employed but not as an RN. Am I eligible?
  • How many hours per week is the Residency?
  • I recently graduated with my ADN (or Diploma) and have not yet applied to BSN programs. Am I eligible?
  • I have an ADN (or Diploma) and am not interested in a BSN. Am I eligible?
  • What counts as being underemployed?
  • When will the program start and how long is the Residency program?
  • Where will residencies take place?

  • I want to apply for the program. How do I get an application?

    Click here to find application materials. (top)


    Is this a Nurse Refresher program?
    No, this is a program designed primarily for newly-licensed RNs who have not had the opportunity yet to work as an RN. If you feel that your core clinical skills are out-of-practice and in need of modernization in order to participate in or re-enter the medical workforce, please utilize this resource to find a Nurse Refresher course that fits your needs. Many schools offer online Nurse Refresher courses that also require in-person clinical placements. (top)


    I called/emailed to express interest in the program and someone took down my information. Do I still need to apply?

    Yes, you do still need to apply. Potential residents that contacted us about the program and provided their email addresses will be sent a link to this page that alerts them when the application is available. (top)


    When are applications due?
    All materials must be received by June 30, 2014. (top)


    Do I need to live in Rhode Island to be part of the program?

    Yes, you need to be a Rhode Island resident to apply. You will be asked to provide documents that establish proof of residency as part of the application process. (top)


    Where can I get a federal background check for the application?

    If you already submitted a federal background check for your NCLEX and have a copy, you can submit that as long as it is dated within the last 3 months. If you did not keep a copy, but had one run within the last three months, you can call the RI Attorney General’s Office at (401) 274-4400, provide your information, and request to have it sent to Stepping Up, Nurse Residency Coordinator, 375 Branch Ave., Providence, RI 02904.

    If you have not had a federal background check done or it is more than three months old, you can obtain one from the Department of the Attorney General’s BCI Division between 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, at 150 South Main Street, Providence, RI 02903. You will need to bring a Driver’s license and a $40 check or money order (no cash is accepted). Have the results sent to Stepping Up, Nurse Residency Coordinator, 375 Branch Ave., Providence, RI 02904.

    Be sure to specify that you need a Federal Background Check, not a State Background Check.

    Note: There is a chance you may need an additional BCI if a site requires it within one month of employment.(top)


    Do I need to have a car to participate?

    No, you do not need to have a car to participate, but we do require that you have access to reliable transportation. Residency schedules and sites will vary and may not fit with the public transportation options available. Participating employers are located throughout the state of Rhode Island. As a program participant, it will be your responsibility to ensure that you arrive on-time. (top)


    I am interested in becoming a nurse, but am just starting my college classes. Can I join the program?

    No, to join the program you must have an active, unencumbered Rhode Island RN license or be able to prove that you passed the NCLEX exam before the program starts in September. You are required to have a Nursing degree to sit this exam. (top)


    Is there a minimum GPA requirement?

    There is no minimum GPA requirement. However, GPA will be used as one of multiple considerations in the selection process. (top)


    I’m currently working full-time as a RN, but am interested in getting experience at one of the program’s partner employers. Can I join the program?

    No, if you are currently working as a RN, you cannot join the program. This program is focused on helping underemployed and unemployed RNs enter the nursing workforce. If you are underemployed (i.e. as a CNA), you are still eligible for the program. (top)


    I am currently employed, but not as a RN. Can I join the program?

    Yes, you can apply for the program if you are actively licensed as a RN, but not working as a RN. However, keep in mind that this program will require a significant time commitment and flexible scheduling. (top)


    How many hours per week is the residency?

    We are in the process of refining the design of our program for the 2014-15 cohort. The prior cohort required a minimum time commitment of 24 hours per week. At least 16 hours will be spent with the preceptor and about six hours will be spent in seminars. The hours with your preceptor can be met through flexible shifts. The seminar days will be pre-scheduled and all participants will attend together.(top)


    I recently graduated with my ADN, but have not had a chance to apply to a BSN program yet. Can I apply to the residency?

    Yes, you should still apply. By September of 2014, you will need to be accepted into a BSN program or enrolled in the 1-credit bridge/transition to practice course taught at CCRI and other nursing schools. To successfully complete the residency program, you will need to actively enroll in a BSN program for the spring 2015 semester. The program coordinator will be able to assist you in the process if you need help.

    However, preference will be given to applicants that supply proof of acceptance into a BSN program with their application. (top)


    I have an associate’s degree in nursing and am not interested in getting my BSN. Can I join the program?

    No, diploma nurse and ADN applicants must continue on to a BSN program as a part of the residency. This is strongly due to the Institute of Medicine’s goal of 80 percent of working RNs being educated at the BSN level by 2020 (source). (top)


    What counts as being underemployed?

    “Underemployment occurs when a worker is either overqualified for his or her job, or is not working full-time and is working fewer hours than desired. For example, a college graduate in microbiology can find no work in his or her field and ends up as a clerk in a department store.” – WIA Definitions for Title I Eligibility

    For the purposes of our program, an underemployed RN is not actively working as an RN. Eligible applicants may be working as a CNA, in other healthcare occupations, or outside the healthcare field entirely (i.e., child care, retail). If you are working full-time, part-time, or per diem as a nurse, you are ineligible to participate.

    Note: Some graduates of Nursing programs find that they are unable to find work as a Nurse and volunteer in order to network and gain clinical experience. Unpaid volunteers working as RNs are welcome to apply as long as all other criteria are met. (top)


    When will the program start and how long is the residency program?

    The residency program will last for six months with three additional months of academic skill building. The program will officially end by June of 2015 with the busiest schedule between September 2014 and March 2015. (top)


    Where will residencies take place?
    Each year, the format and rotation schedule will be different. The 2014-15 schedule will be finalized during the summer of 2014. However, residents will experience nursing in a variety of settings such as: acute care, long-term care, home care, specialty care (such as maternity), behavioral health hospitals and developmental disability providers. (top)


    Last updated March 10, 2014.